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Out of the mouths of slaves : African American language and educational malpractice / John Baugh ; foreword by William Labov. [print]

By: Baugh, John, 1949- [author]Material type: TextTextPublication details: Austin : University of Texas Press, (c)1999. Edition: first editionDescription: xviii, 190 pages : illustrations ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0292708726; 0292708734Subject(s): African Americans -- Languages | English language -- Social aspects -- United States | African Americans -- Education -- Language arts | African Americans -- Social conditions | Slaves -- United States -- Language | Black English | AmericanismsLOC classification: PE3102.O986 1999Online resources: Copyright permission request form. COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
Pt. 1. Orientation. Some common misconceptions about African American vernacular English Language and race: some implications of bias for linguistic science. Pt. 2. The relevance of African American vernacular English to education and social policies. Why what works has not worked for nontraditional students Reading, writing, and rap: lyric shuffle and other motivational strategies to introduce and reinforce literacy Educational malpractice and the Ebonics controversy Linguistic discrimination and American justice. Pt. 3. Cross-cultural communication in social context. The
politics of black power handshakes Changing terms of self-reference among American slave descendants. Pt. 4. Linguistic dimensions of African American vernacular English. Steady: progressive aspect in African American vernacular English Come again: discourse functions in African American vernacular English Hypocorrection: mistakes in the production of African American vernacular English as a second dialect Linguistic perceptions in black and white: racial identification based on speech. Pt. 5. Conclusion. Research trends for African American vernacular English: anthropology, education, and linguistics.
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) G Allen Fleece Library
Circulating Collection - First Floor
Non-fiction PE3102.N42B39 1999 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 31923001011507

Pt. 1. Orientation. Some common misconceptions about African American vernacular English Language and race: some implications of bias for linguistic science. Pt. 2. The relevance of African American vernacular English to education and social policies. Why what works has not worked for nontraditional students Reading, writing, and rap: lyric shuffle and other motivational strategies to introduce and reinforce literacy Educational malpractice and the Ebonics controversy Linguistic discrimination and American justice. Pt. 3. Cross-cultural communication in social context. The

politics of black power handshakes Changing terms of self-reference among American slave descendants. Pt. 4. Linguistic dimensions of African American vernacular English. Steady: progressive aspect in African American vernacular English Come again: discourse functions in African American vernacular English Hypocorrection: mistakes in the production of African American vernacular English as a second dialect Linguistic perceptions in black and white: racial identification based on speech. Pt. 5. Conclusion. Research trends for African American vernacular English: anthropology, education, and linguistics.

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