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The act of Bible reading : a multidisciplinary approach to biblical interpretation / Gordon D. Fee...[and others] ; edited by Elmer Dyck. [print]

Contributor(s): Dyck, Elmer, 1947-Material type: TextTextPublication details: Downers Grove, Illinois : InterVarsity Press, [(c)1996. Description: 182 pages ; 21 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0830816232; 9780830816231Subject(s): Bible -- Hermeneutics | Bible -- ReadingLOC classification: BS476.A286 1996BS476.A286 1996COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
Foreword : Caveat lector Eugene Peterson History as context for interpretation Gordon D. Fee Canon as context for interpretation Elmer Dyck Theology and Bible reading J.I. Packer The sociology of knowledge and the art of suspicion (a sociological interpretation of interpretation) / Craig M. Gay Hermeneutics and the postmodern reaction against "truth" / Loren Wilkinson Toward a biblical spirituality James M. Houston.
Summary: Many approaches for interpreting the Bible have been put forth in recent years. All have their strengths - and their weaknesses. Various members of the Regent College faculty join forces here to articulate a multidisciplinary approach that will enrich our reading of the Bible. Following an introductory caveat lector from Eugene Peterson, Gordon Fee and Elmer Dyck discuss history and canon, respectively, as contexts for interpretation, highlighting the importance of historical-grammatical interpretation within a canonical setting for understanding biblical texts. J. I. Packer explores the importance of theology, both as it informs and as it safeguards Bible reading. Craig M. Gay proffers key insights from sociology, especially the sociology of knowledge, as it cautions us to ask not only what the text says, but who says it says that and why should we believe what they are telling us it says. Facing the challenges of modern secular hermeneutics from Heidegger and Nietzsche to Derrida and Foucault, Loren Wilkinson counters the postmodern reaction against truth. James Houston closes out the discussion, emphasizing that the aim of Bible reading must be godliness and not mere scholarship.
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) G Allen Fleece Library
Circulating Collection - First Floor
Non-fiction BS476.A315 1996 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 31923001526389

Foreword : Caveat lector Eugene Peterson History as context for interpretation Gordon D. Fee Canon as context for interpretation Elmer Dyck Theology and Bible reading J.I. Packer The sociology of knowledge and the art of suspicion (a sociological interpretation of interpretation) / Craig M. Gay Hermeneutics and the postmodern reaction against "truth" / Loren Wilkinson Toward a biblical spirituality James M. Houston.

Many approaches for interpreting the Bible have been put forth in recent years. All have their strengths - and their weaknesses. Various members of the Regent College faculty join forces here to articulate a multidisciplinary approach that will enrich our reading of the Bible. Following an introductory caveat lector from Eugene Peterson, Gordon Fee and Elmer Dyck discuss history and canon, respectively, as contexts for interpretation, highlighting the importance of historical-grammatical interpretation within a canonical setting for understanding biblical texts. J. I. Packer explores the importance of theology, both as it informs and as it safeguards Bible reading. Craig M. Gay proffers key insights from sociology, especially the sociology of knowledge, as it cautions us to ask not only what the text says, but who says it says that and why should we believe what they are telling us it says. Facing the challenges of modern secular hermeneutics from Heidegger and Nietzsche to Derrida and Foucault, Loren Wilkinson counters the postmodern reaction against truth. James Houston closes out the discussion, emphasizing that the aim of Bible reading must be godliness and not mere scholarship.

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