Image from Google Jackets

Revelation / edited by William C. Weinrich. [print]

Contributor(s): Weinrich, William C [edt]Material type: TextTextSeries: Ancient Christian commentary on Scripture. New Testament ; ; 12.Publication details: Downers Grove, Illinois : InterVarsity Press, [(c)2005. Description: xxxii, 454 pages ; 27 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780830814978; 0830814973Subject(s): Bible. Revelation -- Commentaries | New Testament CommentariesGenre/Form: Religious Studies. LOC classification: BS2825.53.R484 2005BS2825.53.W424.R484 2005Online resources: Table of contents COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission: Summary: The Revelation to John--with its vivid images and portraits of conflict leading up to the marriage supper of the Lamb, the cosmic destruction of evil, and the formation of a new heaven and a new earth--was widely read, even as it was variously interpreted in the early church. Approaches to its interpretation ranged from the millenarian approach of Victorinus of Petovium to the more symbolic interpretation of Tyconius, who read Revelation in the sense of the universal and unitary time of the church. Tyconius's Book of Rules, deeply admired by Augustine with its seven principles of interpretation, strongly influenced not only ongoing interpretation of the Revelation but the whole of medieval exegesis. From early on the book of Revelation was more widely accepted in the West than in the East. Indeed the earliest extant commentaries on Revelation in Greek date from Oecumenius's commentary in the sixth century, which was soon accompanied by that of Andrew of Caesarea. Earlier Eastern fathers did, however, make reference to Revelation in noncommentary works. This ACCS volume edited by William C. Weinrich draws heavily on the two Greek commentaries from Oecumenius and Andrew of Caesarea to represent Eastern interpretation, while focusing on six other commentaries as primary witnesses to Western interpretation--those of Victorinus of Petovium, Tyconius, Primasius, Caesarius of Arles, Apringius of Beja and Bede the Venerable. Every effort has been made to give adequate context so that the creative use of Scripture, the theological interest and the pastoral intent can be discerned by readers today. Amid this treasure trove of early interpretation readers will find much that appears in English translation for the first time. https://www.amazon.com/Revelation-Ancient-Christian-Commentary-Scripture/dp/0830814973/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=9780830814978&qid=1601417729&s=books&sr=1-1
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Star ratings
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) G Allen Fleece Library
Circulating Collection - First Floor
Non-fiction BS2825.53.R48 2005 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 31923001509781

COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:

The Revelation to John--with its vivid images and portraits of conflict leading up to the marriage supper of the Lamb, the cosmic destruction of evil, and the formation of a new heaven and a new earth--was widely read, even as it was variously interpreted in the early church. Approaches to its interpretation ranged from the millenarian approach of Victorinus of Petovium to the more symbolic interpretation of Tyconius, who read Revelation in the sense of the universal and unitary time of the church. Tyconius's Book of Rules, deeply admired by Augustine with its seven principles of interpretation, strongly influenced not only ongoing interpretation of the Revelation but the whole of medieval exegesis. From early on the book of Revelation was more widely accepted in the West than in the East. Indeed the earliest extant commentaries on Revelation in Greek date from Oecumenius's commentary in the sixth century, which was soon accompanied by that of Andrew of Caesarea. Earlier Eastern fathers did, however, make reference to Revelation in noncommentary works. This ACCS volume edited by William C. Weinrich draws heavily on the two Greek commentaries from Oecumenius and Andrew of Caesarea to represent Eastern interpretation, while focusing on six other commentaries as primary witnesses to Western interpretation--those of Victorinus of Petovium, Tyconius, Primasius, Caesarius of Arles, Apringius of Beja and Bede the Venerable. Every effort has been made to give adequate context so that the creative use of Scripture, the theological interest and the pastoral intent can be discerned by readers today. Amid this treasure trove of early interpretation readers will find much that appears in English translation for the first time.

https://www.amazon.com/Revelation-Ancient-Christian-Commentary-Scripture/dp/0830814973/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=9780830814978&qid=1601417729&s=books&sr=1-1

William C. Weinrich (D.Theol., Basel) is the academic dean at Concordia Theological Seminary in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. He is professor of early church history at Concordia and serves as the book review editor for Concordia Theological Quarterly. He is the author of Spirit and Martyrdom: A Study of the Work of the Holy Spirit in Contexts of Persecution and Martyrdom in the New Testament and Early Christian Literature and editor of The New Testament Age: Essays in Honor of Bo Reicke.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.
Columbia International University admits students of any race, color, national, and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. The University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national, and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic, and other school-administered programs.