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The chosen people : election, Paul, and Second Temple Judaism / A. Chadwick Thornhill. [print]

By: Material type: TextTextPublication details: Downers Grove, Illinois : InterVarsity Press, [(c)2015.Description: 288 pages ; 23 cmContent type:
  • text
Media type:
  • unmediated
Carrier type:
  • volume
ISBN:
  • 9780830840830
  • 0830840834
Subject(s): LOC classification:
  • BS2655.C467 2015
  • BS2655.J4.T512.C467 2015
COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
The missing link in election God chose whom? election and the individual Who are the people of God? ; Who's in and who's out? election and conditions How big a tent? ; Whose turn is it? election and responsibility Rereading Romans 8:26-11:36 Where do we go from here?
Summary: One of the central touchstones of Second Temple Judaism is election. The Jews considered themselves a people set apart for God's special purpose. So it is not surprising that this concept plays such an important role in Pauline theology. In this careful and provocative study, Chad Thornhill considers how Second Temple understandings of election influenced key Pauline texts. Thornhill seeks to establish the thought patterns of the ancient texts regarding election, with sensitivity to social, historical and literary factors. He carefully considers questions of "extent" (ethnic/national or remnant), the relationship to the individual (corporate or individual in focus), and the relationship to salvation (divine/human agency and the presence of "conditions"). Thornhill looks at the markers or conditions that defined various groups, and considers whether election was viewed by ancient authors as merited, given graciously or both. Thorough and measured, the author contends that individual election is not usually associated with a "soteriological" status but rather with the quality of the individual (or sometimes group) in view
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) G. ALLEN FLEECE LIBRARY CIRCULATING COLLECTION - BACK OF 1ST FLOOR NON-FICTION BS2655.J4T55 2015 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 31923001757059

The missing link in election God chose whom? election and the individual Who are the people of God? ; Who's in and who's out? election and conditions How big a tent? ; Whose turn is it? election and responsibility Rereading Romans 8:26-11:36 Where do we go from here?

One of the central touchstones of Second Temple Judaism is election. The Jews considered themselves a people set apart for God's special purpose. So it is not surprising that this concept plays such an important role in Pauline theology. In this careful and provocative study, Chad Thornhill considers how Second Temple understandings of election influenced key Pauline texts. Thornhill seeks to establish the thought patterns of the ancient texts regarding election, with sensitivity to social, historical and literary factors. He carefully considers questions of "extent" (ethnic/national or remnant), the relationship to the individual (corporate or individual in focus), and the relationship to salvation (divine/human agency and the presence of "conditions"). Thornhill looks at the markers or conditions that defined various groups, and considers whether election was viewed by ancient authors as merited, given graciously or both. Thorough and measured, the author contends that individual election is not usually associated with a "soteriological" status but rather with the quality of the individual (or sometimes group) in view the collective entity is in view in the Jewish notion of election. While Paul is certainly able to move beyond these categories, Thornhill shows how he too follows these patterns.

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