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Non-semitic loanwords in the Hebrew Bible : a lexicon of language contact / Benjamin J. Noonan. [print]

By: Noonan, Benjamin J [author]Material type: TextTextSeries: Linguistic studies in ancient West Semitic ; 14.Publication details: University Park, Pennsylvania : The Pennsylvania State University Press, [(c)2019. Description: xxxv, 512 pages ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1575067749; 9781575067742Subject(s): Bible. Old Testament -- Terminology | Hebrew language -- Foreign words and phrases | Ancient History | Lexicography | Linguistics | Hebrew - HEB | Hebrew languageGenre/Form: Theological. | History. | Linguistics reference Hebrew. | Lexicon -- Hebrew. LOC classification: BS525.N817.N667 2019BS525.N817.N667 2019COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
Introduction: History of research Corpus and parameters of this study Terminology Identifying loanwords Mechanisms of borrowing Loanwords as cultural symbols Conclusion Non-semitic contact in ancient Palestine: The Egyptians The Greeks The Hittites and Luvians The Hurrians The Indo-Aryans The Iranians Conclusion Non-Semitic loanwords in the Hebrew Bible Quantitative analysis: Methodology and terminology General distribution of the Hebrew Bible's loanwords Loanwords and the Hebrew Bible's canonical divisions Loanwords and the Hebrew Bible's source-critical divisions Loanwords and parts of speech Loanwords and domain of use Linguistic analysis: Phonology Orthography Morphology Evidence for dialect of origin and date of borrowing: Egyptian Greek Hittite and Luvian Hurrian Old Indic Old Iranian Synthesis Non-Semitic loanwords as evidence for foreign contact in ancient Palestine: The Egyptians The Greeks The Hittites and Luvians The Hurrians The Indo-Aryans The Iranians.
Summary: Ancient Palestine served as a land bridge between the continents of Asia, Africa, and Europe, and as a result, the ancient Israelites frequently interacted with speakers of non-Semitic languages, including Egyptian, Greek, Hittite and Luwian, Hurrian, Old Indic, and Old Iranian. This linguistic contact led the ancient Israelites to adopt non-Semitic words, many of which appear in the Hebrew Bible. Benjamin J. Noonan explores this process in Non-Semitic Loanwords in the Hebrew Bible, which presents a comprehensive, up-to-date, and linguistically informed analysis of the Hebrew Bible's non-Semitic terminology. In this volume, Noonan identifies all the Hebrew Bible's foreign loanwords and presents them in the form of an annotated lexicon. An appendix to the book analyzes words commonly proposed to be non-Semitic that are, in fact, Semitic, along with the reason for considering them as such. Noonan's study enriches our understanding of the lexical semantics of the Hebrew Bible's non-Semitic terminology, which leads to better translation and exegesis of the biblical text. It also enhances our linguistic understanding of the ancient world, in that the linguistic features it discusses provide significant insight into the phonology, orthography, and morphology of the languages of the ancient Near East. Finally, by tying together linguistic evidence with textual and archaeological data, this work extends our picture of ancient Israel's interactions with non-Semitic peoples. A valuable resource for biblical scholars, historians, archaeologists, and others interested in linguistic and cultural contact between the ancient Israelites and non-Semitic peoples, this book provides significant insight into foreign contact in ancient Israel. https://www.amazon.com/Non-Semitic-Loanwords-Hebrew-Bible-Linguistic/dp/1575067749/ref=sr_1_1?crid=293CFFLLQSXPV&keywords=non-semitic+loanwords+in+the+hebrew+bible&qid=1568050115&s=books&sprefix=non-semitic+loanwords+in+the+hebrew%2Cstripbooks%2C134&sr=1-1
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Introduction: History of research Corpus and parameters of this study Terminology Identifying loanwords Mechanisms of borrowing Loanwords as cultural symbols Conclusion Non-semitic contact in ancient Palestine: The Egyptians The Greeks The Hittites and Luvians The Hurrians The Indo-Aryans The Iranians Conclusion Non-Semitic loanwords in the Hebrew Bible Quantitative analysis: Methodology and terminology General distribution of the Hebrew Bible's loanwords Loanwords and the Hebrew Bible's canonical divisions Loanwords and the Hebrew Bible's source-critical divisions Loanwords and parts of speech Loanwords and domain of use Linguistic analysis: Phonology Orthography Morphology Evidence for dialect of origin and date of borrowing: Egyptian Greek Hittite and Luvian Hurrian Old Indic Old Iranian Synthesis Non-Semitic loanwords as evidence for foreign contact in ancient Palestine: The Egyptians The Greeks The Hittites and Luvians The Hurrians The Indo-Aryans The Iranians.

Ancient Palestine served as a land bridge between the continents of Asia, Africa, and Europe, and as a result, the ancient Israelites frequently interacted with speakers of non-Semitic languages, including Egyptian, Greek, Hittite and Luwian, Hurrian, Old Indic, and Old Iranian. This linguistic contact led the ancient Israelites to adopt non-Semitic words, many of which appear in the Hebrew Bible. Benjamin J. Noonan explores this process in Non-Semitic Loanwords in the Hebrew Bible, which presents a comprehensive, up-to-date, and linguistically informed analysis of the Hebrew Bible's non-Semitic terminology. In this volume, Noonan identifies all the Hebrew Bible's foreign loanwords and presents them in the form of an annotated lexicon. An appendix to the book analyzes words commonly proposed to be non-Semitic that are, in fact, Semitic, along with the reason for considering them as such. Noonan's study enriches our understanding of the lexical semantics of the Hebrew Bible's non-Semitic terminology, which leads to better translation and exegesis of the biblical text. It also enhances our linguistic understanding of the ancient world, in that the linguistic features it discusses provide significant insight into the phonology, orthography, and morphology of the languages of the ancient Near East. Finally, by tying together linguistic evidence with textual and archaeological data, this work extends our picture of ancient Israel's interactions with non-Semitic peoples. A valuable resource for biblical scholars, historians, archaeologists, and others interested in linguistic and cultural contact between the ancient Israelites and non-Semitic peoples, this book provides significant insight into foreign contact in ancient Israel.

https://www.amazon.com/Non-Semitic-Loanwords-Hebrew-Bible-Linguistic/dp/1575067749/ref=sr_1_1?crid=293CFFLLQSXPV&keywords=non-semitic+loanwords+in+the+hebrew+bible&qid=1568050115&s=books&sprefix=non-semitic+loanwords+in+the+hebrew%2Cstripbooks%2C134&sr=1-1

COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:

Benjamin J. Noonan is Associate Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at Columbia International University. He is co-editor of "Where Shall Wisdom Be Found?" A Grammatical Tribute to Professor Stephen A. Kaufman, also published by Eisenbrauns.

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