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Isaiah, the eighth century prophet : his times & his preaching / John H. Hayes, Stuart A. Irvine. [print]

By: Hayes, John H, 1934-2013 [author]Contributor(s): Irvine, Stuart AMaterial type: TextTextPublication details: Nashville : Abingdon Press, (c)1987. Description: 416 pages : map ; 22 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0687197058; 9780687197057Subject(s): Isaiah (Biblical prophet) | Isaie, le prophete | Bible. Isaiah, I-XXXIX -- Commentaries | Bible., O.T., Isaiah I-XXXIX - Commentaries | Bible. A.T. Isaie. I-XXXIX -- CommentairesLOC classification: BS1515.3.H417.I835 1987BS1515.3.I72.I835 1987COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
12. A word against Jacob (9:8-10:4) ; 13. Assyria, the rod of Yahweh's anger (10:5-27c) ; 14. An ensign for the nations (10:27d-12:6) ; 15. Judgment on Babylon (13:1-22) ; 16. Yahweh's purpose and the death of a king (14:1-27) ; 17. Rejoice not, O Philistia (14:28-32) ; 18. An oracle on Moab (15:1-16:14) ; 19. Old coalitions never die (17:1-14) ; 20. Ambassadors in papyrus boats (18:1-7) ; 21. Assyrian, Egyptian, and Israelite ecumenism (19:1-25) ; 22. A prophetic demonstration (20:1-6) ; 23. The oracle on the sealand (21:1-17) ; 24. He took away the covering of Judah (22:1-14) ; 25. Two officials condemned (22:15-25) ; 26. The demise of Tyre (23:1-18) ; 27. A cantata of salvation (24-27) ; 28. The drunkards of Ephraim and the foolish leaders of Jerusalem (28:1-29) ; 29. Zion to be threatened but saved (29:1-24) ; 30. Woe to those who go down to Egypt (30:1-33) ; 31. Egypt is human not divine (31:1-9) ; 32. A king in righteousness should reign (32:1-20) ; 33. Yahweh for us (33:1-24) ; 34. Again Zion threatened but delivered (36:1-37:38) ; 35. Hezekiah's sickness (38:1-22) ; 36. Visiting ambassadors from Babylon (39:1-8) ; Appendix: the history of the interpretation of Isaiah 1-39.
I. The historical background 750-700 B.C.E. ; 1. Assyrian relations with Syria-Palestine A. Tiglath-pileser III (745-727 B.C.E.) ; B. Shalmaneser V (727-722 B.C.E.) ; C. Sargon II (722-705 B.C.E.) ; D. Sennacherib (704-681 B.C.E.) ; 2. Egypt during the second half of the eighth century 3. Historical developments within Israel and Judah A. The chronological problems B. Jeroboam II of Israel and Uzziah/Jotham of Judah C. Israelite Civil War D. Ahaz and the Syro-Ephraimitic Crisis E. The reign of Hezekiah II. The Religious and theological backgrounds of Isaiah's ministry III. The nature and function of prophetic speech in Isaiah IV. Isaiah's preaching and the Isaianic narratives 1. The superscription (1:1) ; 2. An earthquake and its aftermath (1:2-20) ; 3. Jerusalem: past, present, and future (1:21-2:5) ; 4. Yahweh had a day (2:6-22) ; 5. A society topsy-turvy (3:1-15) ; 6. The daughters of Jerusalem (3:16-4:6) ; 7. A vineyard gone bad (5:1-30) ; 8. A new task and a new message (6:1-13) ; 9. Deliverance for the house of David disaster for Judah (7:1-25) ; 10. Refusing the waters of Shiloah (8:1-20) ; 11. Ahaz and the throne of David (8:21-9:7).
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Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode
Reference (Library Use ONLY) Reference (Library Use ONLY) G Allen Fleece Library
Reference (1st floor - front of library)
Research BS1515.3.H39 1987 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Not for loan BIB4548 31923001615927

Includes bibliographical references.

12. A word against Jacob (9:8-10:4) ; 13. Assyria, the rod of Yahweh's anger (10:5-27c) ; 14. An ensign for the nations (10:27d-12:6) ; 15. Judgment on Babylon (13:1-22) ; 16. Yahweh's purpose and the death of a king (14:1-27) ; 17. Rejoice not, O Philistia (14:28-32) ; 18. An oracle on Moab (15:1-16:14) ; 19. Old coalitions never die (17:1-14) ; 20. Ambassadors in papyrus boats (18:1-7) ; 21. Assyrian, Egyptian, and Israelite ecumenism (19:1-25) ; 22. A prophetic demonstration (20:1-6) ; 23. The oracle on the sealand (21:1-17) ; 24. He took away the covering of Judah (22:1-14) ; 25. Two officials condemned (22:15-25) ; 26. The demise of Tyre (23:1-18) ; 27. A cantata of salvation (24-27) ; 28. The drunkards of Ephraim and the foolish leaders of Jerusalem (28:1-29) ; 29. Zion to be threatened but saved (29:1-24) ; 30. Woe to those who go down to Egypt (30:1-33) ; 31. Egypt is human not divine (31:1-9) ; 32. A king in righteousness should reign (32:1-20) ; 33. Yahweh for us (33:1-24) ; 34. Again Zion threatened but delivered (36:1-37:38) ; 35. Hezekiah's sickness (38:1-22) ; 36. Visiting ambassadors from Babylon (39:1-8) ; Appendix: the history of the interpretation of Isaiah 1-39.

I. The historical background 750-700 B.C.E. ; 1. Assyrian relations with Syria-Palestine A. Tiglath-pileser III (745-727 B.C.E.) ; B. Shalmaneser V (727-722 B.C.E.) ; C. Sargon II (722-705 B.C.E.) ; D. Sennacherib (704-681 B.C.E.) ; 2. Egypt during the second half of the eighth century 3. Historical developments within Israel and Judah A. The chronological problems B. Jeroboam II of Israel and Uzziah/Jotham of Judah C. Israelite Civil War D. Ahaz and the Syro-Ephraimitic Crisis E. The reign of Hezekiah II. The Religious and theological backgrounds of Isaiah's ministry III. The nature and function of prophetic speech in Isaiah IV. Isaiah's preaching and the Isaianic narratives 1. The superscription (1:1) ; 2. An earthquake and its aftermath (1:2-20) ; 3. Jerusalem: past, present, and future (1:21-2:5) ; 4. Yahweh had a day (2:6-22) ; 5. A society topsy-turvy (3:1-15) ; 6. The daughters of Jerusalem (3:16-4:6) ; 7. A vineyard gone bad (5:1-30) ; 8. A new task and a new message (6:1-13) ; 9. Deliverance for the house of David disaster for Judah (7:1-25) ; 10. Refusing the waters of Shiloah (8:1-20) ; 11. Ahaz and the throne of David (8:21-9:7).

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