Scripture and law in the Dead Sea scrolls / Alex P. Jassen. [print]

By: Jassen, Alex P [author]Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, New York : Cambridge University Press, (c)2014Description: xxii, 298 pages ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780521196048; 0521196043Subject(s): Dead Sea scrolls | Jewish law | RELIGION Judaism GeneralLOC classification: BM487.S375 2014Online resources: Copyright permission request form. COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
The Dead Sea scrolls and the history of Jewish law and legal exegesis Jewish legal exegesis and the origins and development of the canon Isaiah 58:13 and the Sabbath prohibition on speech in the Dead Sea scrolls, Part 1 : the Damascus Document Isaiah 58:13 and the Sabbath prohibition on speech in the Dead Sea scrolls, Part 2 : 4QHalakha B Isaiah 58:13 and the Sabbath prohibition on speech in the Book of Jubilees and rabbinic literature Isaiah 58:13 and the restriction on thoughts of labor on the Sabbath in the Dead Sea scrolls Isaiah 58:13 and the restriction on thoughts of labor on the Sabbath in Philo and rabbinic literature Jeremiah 17:21-22 and the Sabbath carrying prohibition in the Dead Sea scrolls Jeremiah 17:21-22 and the Sabbath carrying prohibition in Nehemiah, Jubilees, and Rabbinic literature Non-Pentateuchal passages as prooftexts.
Summary: "This book is the first work of its kind to examine legal exegesis in the Dead Sea Scrolls from the perspective of both the history of Jewish law and early Jewish scriptural interpretation. It shows how the Dead Sea Scrolls transform the meaning and application of biblical law to meet the needs of new historical and cultural settings. The Dead Sea Scrolls legal texts are examined through the comparative lens of law and legal interpretation in Second Temple Judaism and rabbinic Judaism. The creative interpretation of scriptural texts in the Dead Sea Scrolls responds to the tension between seemingly rigid authoritative scripture and the need for law and scripture to be perpetually evolving entities. The ongoing legal interpretation of scriptural texts frames the development of Jewish law at the same time as it shapes the nature of the biblical canon"--
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Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) G Allen Fleece Library
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Non-fiction BM487 .J37 2014 (Browse shelf) Available 31923001875554

The Dead Sea scrolls and the history of Jewish law and legal exegesis Jewish legal exegesis and the origins and development of the canon Isaiah 58:13 and the Sabbath prohibition on speech in the Dead Sea scrolls, Part 1 : the Damascus Document Isaiah 58:13 and the Sabbath prohibition on speech in the Dead Sea scrolls, Part 2 : 4QHalakha B Isaiah 58:13 and the Sabbath prohibition on speech in the Book of Jubilees and rabbinic literature Isaiah 58:13 and the restriction on thoughts of labor on the Sabbath in the Dead Sea scrolls Isaiah 58:13 and the restriction on thoughts of labor on the Sabbath in Philo and rabbinic literature Jeremiah 17:21-22 and the Sabbath carrying prohibition in the Dead Sea scrolls Jeremiah 17:21-22 and the Sabbath carrying prohibition in Nehemiah, Jubilees, and Rabbinic literature Non-Pentateuchal passages as prooftexts.

"This book is the first work of its kind to examine legal exegesis in the Dead Sea Scrolls from the perspective of both the history of Jewish law and early Jewish scriptural interpretation. It shows how the Dead Sea Scrolls transform the meaning and application of biblical law to meet the needs of new historical and cultural settings. The Dead Sea Scrolls legal texts are examined through the comparative lens of law and legal interpretation in Second Temple Judaism and rabbinic Judaism. The creative interpretation of scriptural texts in the Dead Sea Scrolls responds to the tension between seemingly rigid authoritative scripture and the need for law and scripture to be perpetually evolving entities. The ongoing legal interpretation of scriptural texts frames the development of Jewish law at the same time as it shapes the nature of the biblical canon"--

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