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Use of the third person for self-reference by Jesus and Yahweh : a study of Illeism in the Bible and ancient Near Eastern texts and its implications for Christology / by Roderick Elledge. [print]

By: Elledge, Roderick [author]Material type: TextTextSeries: Library of New Testament studies ; 575.Publication details: London ; New York, New York : Bloomsbury T&T Clark, [(c)2017. Description: xiv, 182 pages ; 25 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780567671431; 0567671437Subject(s): Bible -- Language, style | Middle Eastern literature -- History and criticism | Self-knowledge, Theory ofLOC classification: BS537.U846 2017BS537.E45.U846 2017COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
Thesis Methodology History of Research.
Early Evidence Ancient Historians Conclusion.
Deferential Use Within an Oath Formula Summons to Listen Characterization of the Speaker Within a Trial Setting/Historical Context In the Speech of Kings King David In the Speech of Yahweh Conclusion.
Illeism in the Speech of Gods of the ANE Illeism in the Speech of Kings of the ANE Deferential Use of Illeism in the ANE Texts Conclusion Excursus: Deity of Kings and Kingship of Gods.
Illeism in Paul's Letters The Illeism of Jesus Conclusion.
Summary Conclusions.
Illeisms of Yahweh in Construct Evaluated Illeisms of Yahweh Illeism of Jesus by Book Occurrences of Biblical Illeism By Person.
Illeism of OT kings Illeism in the OT Self-references of Jesus by book Illeisms of Yahweh in construct Evaluated illeisms of Yahweh Illeism of Jesus by book Occurrences of biblical illeism by person.
Abstract: While an individual referring to themselves in the third person may sound unusual, this phenomenon (known as illeism) is consistently and extensively reflected in the direct speech of both Jesus and Yahweh. This in turn raises various questions: why are Jesus and Yahweh presented as speaking in such a manner? Who else employs illeism in the Bible? Does it occur in the Ancient Near Eastern texts and, if so, who utilises it? And lastly, is there a relationship between the illeism as used by Yahweh, and the illeism as used by Jesus? Elledge addresses an issue in Biblical texts often neglected by scholarship: conducting an extensive survey of the use of illeism in the Bible and the Ancient Near Eastern texts, and preservin evidence that his phenomenon, as used by Jesus, reflects both royal and divine themes that are apparent across several different religions and cultures. Through Elledge's examinations of illeism in Classical Antiquity, Ancient Near Eastern Texts and the Old and New Testament, this book provides a fresh perspective on the divine use of the third person, contributing substantial analysis ot the ongoing discussion of Jesus' divinity and self-understanding.
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) G Allen Fleece Library
Circulating Collection - First Floor
Non-fiction BS537.E45 2017 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 31923001748140

Chapter 1. Introduction

Thesis Methodology History of Research.

Chapter 2. Illeism in Classical Antiquity

Early Evidence Ancient Historians Conclusion.

Chapter 3. Illeism in the Old Testament

Deferential Use Within an Oath Formula Summons to Listen Characterization of the Speaker Within a Trial Setting/Historical Context In the Speech of Kings King David In the Speech of Yahweh Conclusion.

Chapter 4. Illeism in Ancient Near Eastern Texts

Illeism in the Speech of Gods of the ANE Illeism in the Speech of Kings of the ANE Deferential Use of Illeism in the ANE Texts Conclusion Excursus: Deity of Kings and Kingship of Gods.

Chapter 5. Illeism in the New Testament

Illeism in Paul's Letters The Illeism of Jesus Conclusion.

Chapter 6. Summary and Conclusions

Summary Conclusions.

Appendix

Illeisms of Yahweh in Construct Evaluated Illeisms of Yahweh Illeism of Jesus by Book Occurrences of Biblical Illeism By Person.

List of Tables

Illeism of OT kings Illeism in the OT Self-references of Jesus by book Illeisms of Yahweh in construct Evaluated illeisms of Yahweh Illeism of Jesus by book Occurrences of biblical illeism by person.

While an individual referring to themselves in the third person may sound unusual, this phenomenon (known as illeism) is consistently and extensively reflected in the direct speech of both Jesus and Yahweh. This in turn raises various questions: why are Jesus and Yahweh presented as speaking in such a manner? Who else employs illeism in the Bible? Does it occur in the Ancient Near Eastern texts and, if so, who utilises it? And lastly, is there a relationship between the illeism as used by Yahweh, and the illeism as used by Jesus? Elledge addresses an issue in Biblical texts often neglected by scholarship: conducting an extensive survey of the use of illeism in the Bible and the Ancient Near Eastern texts, and preservin evidence that his phenomenon, as used by Jesus, reflects both royal and divine themes that are apparent across several different religions and cultures. Through Elledge's examinations of illeism in Classical Antiquity, Ancient Near Eastern Texts and the Old and New Testament, this book provides a fresh perspective on the divine use of the third person, contributing substantial analysis ot the ongoing discussion of Jesus' divinity and self-understanding.

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