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Sin, impurity, sacrifice, atonement : the priestly conceptions / Jay Sklar. [print]

By: Sklar, Jay [author]Material type: TextTextSeries: Hebrew Bible monographs ; 2.Publication details: Sheffield : Sheffield Phoenix Press, [(c)2015. Edition: First published in paperbackDescription: xi, 212 Seiten. ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781909697881; 1909697885; 9781905048120; 1905048122Subject(s): Atonement -- Biblical teaching | Atonement (Judaism) | Sin -- Biblical teaching | Sacrifice -- Biblical teaching | Sacrifice -- Judaism | Purity, Ritual -- Biblical teaching | Purity, Ritual -- JudaismLOC classification: BS1199.S565 2015BS1199.A85.S628.S565 2015COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
The Connection between Sin and Punishment The Consequences of Sin in the Priestly Literature Summary and Comparison of the Penalties for Sin.
*** Defined Survey of Previous Definitions and Renderings of *** ; Summary.
*** In Contexts of Sin Summary.
Purification and *** ; Consecration and *** ; Purification, Consecration, and *** ; ***, Purgation, and *** ; Summary.
Approaches to the Relationship between Sin and Impurity ; ** in the Priestly Literature Summary.
Leviticus 17.11 Summary and Conclusion.
Abstract: The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated 'atone', means the way of dealing with both sin and with impurity--which might seem very different things. Sklar's first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so 'atonement' may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not 'atone' but 'effect purgation', impurity also endagers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of hte famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that 'blood makes atonement' (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification.
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) G Allen Fleece Library
Circulating Collection - First Floor
Non-fiction BS1199.A85 2015 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 31923001748454

Includes bibliographical references (pages (c)194.-199) and indexes.

Part I: *** In Contexts of Sin

Chapter 1. The Consequences of Sin in the Priestly Literature

The Connection between Sin and Punishment The Consequences of Sin in the Priestly Literature Summary and Comparison of the Penalties for Sin.

Chapter 2. *** Defined

*** Defined Survey of Previous Definitions and Renderings of *** ; Summary.

Chapter 3. The Verb *** In Contexts of Sin

*** In Contexts of Sin Summary.

Part II: *** In Contexts of Impurity

Chapter 4. The Verb *** In Contexts of Impurity

Purification and *** ; Consecration and *** ; Purification, Consecration, and *** ; ***, Purgation, and *** ; Summary.

Part III: Sin, Impurity, and ***

Chapter 5. The Relationship Between Sin and Impurity and Its Relevance to ***

Approaches to the Relationship between Sin and Impurity ; ** in the Priestly Literature Summary.

Part IV: *** and the Role of Blood

Chapter 6. A Consideration of hte Role of Blood in Sacrificial Atonement, With Special Reference to Leviticus 17.11

Leviticus 17.11 Summary and Conclusion.

Chapter 7. Conclusion

Appendix: *** and Its Syntagmatic Relationsin the Priestly Literature

The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated 'atone', means the way of dealing with both sin and with impurity--which might seem very different things. Sklar's first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so 'atonement' may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not 'atone' but 'effect purgation', impurity also endagers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of hte famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that 'blood makes atonement' (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification.

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