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Surviving genocide : native nations and the United States from the American Revolution to bleeding Kansas / Jeffrey Ostler. [print]

By: Ostler, Jeffrey [author]Material type: TextTextPublication details: New Haven, Connecticut : Yale University Press, [(c)2019. Description: ix, 533 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780300255362; 0300255365; 9780300218121; 0300218125Subject(s): | Indians, Treatment of -- North America -- History | Indians, Treatment of -- East (U.S.) -- History | Indians of North America -- Crimes against | Indians of North America -- Violence against | Genocide -- United States -- History | Genocide -- East (U.S.) -- History | Indian Removal, 1813-1903 | North America | United States | East United StatesGenre/Form: History LOC classification: E93.O885.S878 2019E93.O85.S878 2019COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
PART 1: DISEASE, WAR, AND DISPOSSESSION Trajectories, 1500s-1763 Wars of Revolution and Independence, 1763-1783 Just and Lawful Wars, 1783-1795 Survival and New Threats, 1795-1810 Wars of 1812
PART 2: PREPARING FOR REMOVAL Nonvanishing Indians on the Eve of Removal, 1815-1830 West of the Mississippi, 1803-1835
PART 3: REMOVAL. Removal and the Southern Indian Nations, 1830-1840s ; Removal and the Northern Indian Nations, 1830-1850s ; Destruction and Survival in the Zone of Removal, 1840s-1860 The Name of Removal
CONCLUSION: Historians and Prophets
APPENDIX 1. The Question of Genocide in U.S. History
APPENDIX 2. Population Estimates by Nation.
Summary: In the first part of this sweeping two-volume history, Jeffrey Ostler investigates how American democracy relied on Indian dispossession and the federally sanctioned use of force to remove or slaughter Indians in the way of U.S. expansion. He charts the losses that Indians suffered from relentless violence and upheaval and the attendant effects of disease, deprivation, and exposure. This volume centers on the eastern United States from the 1750s to the start of the Civil War. An authoritative contribution to the history of the United States' violent path toward building a continental empire, this ambitious and well-researched book deepens our understanding of the seizure of indigenous lands, including the use of treaties to create the appearance of Native consent to dispossession. Ostler also carefully documents the resilience of Native people, showing how they survived genocide by creating alliances, defending their towns, and rebuilding their communities.
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) G Allen Fleece Library
Circulating Collection - First Floor
Non-fiction E93.O85.S878 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 31923002066187

PART 1: DISEASE, WAR, AND DISPOSSESSION Trajectories, 1500s-1763 Wars of Revolution and Independence, 1763-1783 Just and Lawful Wars, 1783-1795 Survival and New Threats, 1795-1810 Wars of 1812

PART 2: PREPARING FOR REMOVAL Nonvanishing Indians on the Eve of Removal, 1815-1830 West of the Mississippi, 1803-1835

PART 3: REMOVAL. Removal and the Southern Indian Nations, 1830-1840s ; Removal and the Northern Indian Nations, 1830-1850s ; Destruction and Survival in the Zone of Removal, 1840s-1860 The Name of Removal

CONCLUSION: Historians and Prophets

APPENDIX 1. The Question of Genocide in U.S. History

APPENDIX 2. Population Estimates by Nation.

In the first part of this sweeping two-volume history, Jeffrey Ostler investigates how American democracy relied on Indian dispossession and the federally sanctioned use of force to remove or slaughter Indians in the way of U.S. expansion. He charts the losses that Indians suffered from relentless violence and upheaval and the attendant effects of disease, deprivation, and exposure. This volume centers on the eastern United States from the 1750s to the start of the Civil War. An authoritative contribution to the history of the United States' violent path toward building a continental empire, this ambitious and well-researched book deepens our understanding of the seizure of indigenous lands, including the use of treaties to create the appearance of Native consent to dispossession. Ostler also carefully documents the resilience of Native people, showing how they survived genocide by creating alliances, defending their towns, and rebuilding their communities. Link to source of summary

COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:

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