Speaking the Unspeakable in Postwar Germany Toward a Public Discourse on the Holocaust / Sonja Boos. [print]

By: Boos, Sonja, 1972- [author]Contributor(s): Project Muse []Material type: TextTextSeries: Signale : modern German letters, cultures, and thoughtPublisher: Ithaca, New York : Cornell University Library, [(c)2014; Baltimore, Maryland : Project MUSE, 2015Description: 1 online resource (pages cm.)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780801471957; 0801471958Subject(s): Public opinion -- Germany (West) | Speeches, addresses, etc., German -- History and criticism | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Public opinion | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Influence | Germany (West) -- Intellectual lifeLOC classification: D804.3D804.3.B724.S643 2014Online resources: Click here to access online COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission: https://lib.ciu.edu/copyright-request-form
Contents:
Introduction : an Archimedean podium Martin Buber Paul Celan Ingeborg Bachmann Hannah Arendt Uwe Johnson Peter Szondi Peter Weiss Conclusion : speaking of the noose in the country of the hangman (Theodor W. Adorno).
Summary: "An interdisciplinary study of a diverse set of public speeches given by major literary and cultural figures in the 1950s and 1960s. Through close readings of canonical speeches by Hannah Arendt, Theodor W. Adorno, Ingeborg Bachmann, Martin Buber, Paul Celan, Uwe Johnson, Peter Szondi, and Peter Weiss, Sonja Boos demonstrates that these speakers both facilitated and subverted the construction of a public discourse about the Holocaust in postwar West Germany. The author's analysis of original audio recordings of the speech events (several of which will be available on a companion website) improves our understanding of the spoken, performative dimension of public speeches. While emphasizing the social constructedness of discourse, experience, and identity, Boos does not neglect the pragmatic conditions of aesthetic and intellectual production--most notably, the felt need to respond to the breach in tradition caused by the Holocaust. The book thereby illuminates the process by which a set of writers and intellectuals, instead of trying to mend what they perceived as a radical break in historical continuity or corroborating the myth of a "new beginning," searched for ways to make this historical rupture rhetorically and semantically discernible and literally audible"--
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
D804.3B667 2014 (Browse shelf) Link to resource Available
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
D804.3B667 2014 (Browse shelf) Link to resource Available

Introduction : an Archimedean podium Martin Buber Paul Celan Ingeborg Bachmann Hannah Arendt Uwe Johnson Peter Szondi Peter Weiss Conclusion : speaking of the noose in the country of the hangman (Theodor W. Adorno).

"An interdisciplinary study of a diverse set of public speeches given by major literary and cultural figures in the 1950s and 1960s. Through close readings of canonical speeches by Hannah Arendt, Theodor W. Adorno, Ingeborg Bachmann, Martin Buber, Paul Celan, Uwe Johnson, Peter Szondi, and Peter Weiss, Sonja Boos demonstrates that these speakers both facilitated and subverted the construction of a public discourse about the Holocaust in postwar West Germany. The author's analysis of original audio recordings of the speech events (several of which will be available on a companion website) improves our understanding of the spoken, performative dimension of public speeches. While emphasizing the social constructedness of discourse, experience, and identity, Boos does not neglect the pragmatic conditions of aesthetic and intellectual production--most notably, the felt need to respond to the breach in tradition caused by the Holocaust. The book thereby illuminates the process by which a set of writers and intellectuals, instead of trying to mend what they perceived as a radical break in historical continuity or corroborating the myth of a "new beginning," searched for ways to make this historical rupture rhetorically and semantically discernible and literally audible"--

COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:

https://lib.ciu.edu/copyright-request-form

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.
Columbia International University admits students of any race, color, national, and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. The University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national, and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic, and other school-administered programs.