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No Useless Mouth Waging War and Fighting Hunger in the American Revolution / Rachel B. Herrmann. [print]

By: Herrmann, Rachel B [author]Contributor(s): Project Muse []Material type: TextTextPublication details: Ithaca : Cornell University Press, [(c)2019. ; Baltimore, Maryland : Project MUSE, 2019. Description: 1 online resource (1 online resource.)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781501716133Subject(s): Sierra Leone -- History -- To 1896 | Nova Scotia -- History -- 1763-1867 | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- African Americans | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Indians | African Americans -- Food -- History -- 18th century | Indians of North America -- Food -- History -- 18th century | Food security -- Sierra Leone -- History -- 18th century | Food security -- Nova Scotia -- History -- 18th century | Food security -- United States -- History -- 18th centuryLOC classification: E269.I5E269.I5.H568.N687 2019Online resources: Click here to access online COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission: https://lib.ciu.edu/copyright-request-form
Contents:
Introduction : why the fight against hunger mattered Hunger, accommodation, and violence in colonial America Iroquois food diplomacy in the revolutionary North Cherokee and Creek victual warfare in the revolutionary South Black victual warriors and hunger creation Fighting hunger, fearing violence after the Revolutionary War Learning from restrictive food laws in Nova Scotia Victual imperialism and U.S. Indian policy Black loyalist hunger prevention in Sierra Leone Conclusion : why native and black revolutionaries lost the fight.
Summary: "Argues that Native American and formerly enslaved communities lost the fight against hunger because white officials in the United States, Nova Scotia, and Sierra Leone curtailed the abilities of men and women to fight hunger on their own terms"--
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Item type Current library Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
E269.I5H477 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
E269.I5H477 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
E269.I5H477 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available

Introduction : why the fight against hunger mattered Hunger, accommodation, and violence in colonial America Iroquois food diplomacy in the revolutionary North Cherokee and Creek victual warfare in the revolutionary South Black victual warriors and hunger creation Fighting hunger, fearing violence after the Revolutionary War Learning from restrictive food laws in Nova Scotia Victual imperialism and U.S. Indian policy Black loyalist hunger prevention in Sierra Leone Conclusion : why native and black revolutionaries lost the fight.

"Argues that Native American and formerly enslaved communities lost the fight against hunger because white officials in the United States, Nova Scotia, and Sierra Leone curtailed the abilities of men and women to fight hunger on their own terms"--

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