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The Beautiful, Novel, and Strange Aesthetics and Heterodoxy / Ronald Paulson. [print]

By: Paulson, Ronald [author]Contributor(s): Project Muse | Project Muse []Material type: TextTextDescription: 1 online resource (1 online resource xix, 369 pages) : illustrations)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781421430119Subject(s): Art et litterature -- Grande-Bretagne -- 18e siecle | Roman anglais -- 18e siecle -- Histoire et critique | Litterature anglaise -- 18e siecle -- Histoire et critique | Esthetique -- Grande-Bretagne -- 18e siecle | Esthetica | Engels | Fiction -- Technique | Art and literature | Fiction -- Technique | Literature and society -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | Aesthetics, British -- 18th century | Art and literature -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | English fiction -- 18th century -- History and criticism | Great Britain | Great Britain | Visual arts AestheticsGenre/Form: Electronic books. | History. | Criticism, interpretation, etc. LOC classification: PR858.A74PR858.A74.P332.B438 2019Online resources: Click here to access online COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission: https://lib.ciu.edu/copyright-request-form
Contents:
Aesthetics and deism Shaftesburian disinterestedness Addison's aesthetics of the novel The conversation piece : politeness and subversion The "Great Creation" : Fielding Aesthetics and erotics : Cleland, Fielding, and Sterne The strange, trivial and infantile : books for children From novel to strange to "sublime" ; From novel to picturesque The novelizing of Hogarth.
Summary: Paulson retrieves an aesthetics that had strong support during the eighteenth century but has been obscured both by the more dominant academic discourse of Shaftesbury (and later Sir Joshua Reynolds) and by current trends in art and literary history. Arguing that the two traditions comprised not only painterly but also literary theory and practice, Paulson explores the innovations of Henry Fielding, John Cleland, Laurence Sterne, and Oliver Goldsmith, which followed and complemented the practice in the visual arts of Hogarth and his followers.Summary: In The Beautiful, Novel, and Strange Ronald Paulson fills a lacuna in studies of aesthetics at its point of origin in England in the 1700s. He shows how aesthetics took off not only from British empiricism but also from such forms of religious heterodoxy as deism. The third earl of Shaftesbury, the founder of aesthetics, replaced the Christian God of rewards and punishments with beauty - worship of God, with a taste for a work of art. William Hogarth, reacting against Shaftesbury's "disinterestedness," replaced his Platonic abstractions with an aesthetics centered on the human body, gendered female, and based on an epistemology of curiosity, pursuit, and seduction. Paulson shows Hogarth creating, first in practice and then in theory, a middle area between the Beautiful and the Sublime by adapting Joseph Addison's category (in the Spectator) of the Novel, Uncommon, and Strange.
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Item type Current library Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
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Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
PR858.A74P385 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
PR858.A74P385 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available

Open access edition supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities/ Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Humanities Open Book Program.

The text of this book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Originally published as Johns Hopkins Press in 1996

Aesthetics and deism Shaftesburian disinterestedness Addison's aesthetics of the novel The conversation piece : politeness and subversion The "Great Creation" : Fielding Aesthetics and erotics : Cleland, Fielding, and Sterne The strange, trivial and infantile : books for children From novel to strange to "sublime" ; From novel to picturesque The novelizing of Hogarth.

Paulson retrieves an aesthetics that had strong support during the eighteenth century but has been obscured both by the more dominant academic discourse of Shaftesbury (and later Sir Joshua Reynolds) and by current trends in art and literary history. Arguing that the two traditions comprised not only painterly but also literary theory and practice, Paulson explores the innovations of Henry Fielding, John Cleland, Laurence Sterne, and Oliver Goldsmith, which followed and complemented the practice in the visual arts of Hogarth and his followers.

In The Beautiful, Novel, and Strange Ronald Paulson fills a lacuna in studies of aesthetics at its point of origin in England in the 1700s. He shows how aesthetics took off not only from British empiricism but also from such forms of religious heterodoxy as deism. The third earl of Shaftesbury, the founder of aesthetics, replaced the Christian God of rewards and punishments with beauty - worship of God, with a taste for a work of art. William Hogarth, reacting against Shaftesbury's "disinterestedness," replaced his Platonic abstractions with an aesthetics centered on the human body, gendered female, and based on an epistemology of curiosity, pursuit, and seduction. Paulson shows Hogarth creating, first in practice and then in theory, a middle area between the Beautiful and the Sublime by adapting Joseph Addison's category (in the Spectator) of the Novel, Uncommon, and Strange.

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