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Making Furniture in Preindustrial America The Social Economy of Newtown and Woodbury, Connecticut / Edward S. Cooke, Jr. [print]

By: Cooke, Edward S [author]Contributor(s): Project Muse | Project Muse []Material type: TextTextSeries: Studies in industry and society ; 10Description: 1 online resource (1 online resource xiii, 295 pages) : illustrations)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781421436074Subject(s): M©obeltischlerei | Furniture industry and trade | Furniture | Economic history | Furniture industry and trade -- Connecticut -- History | Furniture -- Connecticut -- Woodbury -- History -- 19th century | Furniture -- Connecticut -- Woodbury -- History -- 18th century | Furniture -- Connecticut -- Newtown -- History -- 19th century | Neuengland | Connecticut -- Woodbury | Connecticut -- Newtown | Connecticut | Woodbury (Conn.) -- Economic conditions | Newtown (Conn.) -- Economic conditionsGenre/Form: History. | Electronic books. LOC classification: TT194TT194.C772.M355 2019Online resources: Click here to access online COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission: https://lib.ciu.edu/copyright-request-form
Contents:
List of Tables and Charts Acknowledgments Introduction: The Need for the Artisanal Voice (starting pages 3) ; 1 The Preindustrial Joiner in Western Connecticut, 1760-1820 (starting pages 13) ; 2 The Social Economy of the Preindustrial Joiner (starting pages 33) ; 3 The Joiners of Newtown and Woodbury (starting pages 49) ; 4 Socioeconomic Structure in Newtown and Woodbury (starting pages 69) ; 5 Consumer Behavior in Newtown and Woodbury (starting pages 91) ; 6 Workmanship of Habit: The Furniture of Newtown (starting pages 118) ; 7 Workmanship of Competition: The Furniture of Woodbury (starting pages 151) ; Conclusion: The Response to Market Capitalism (starting pages 190) ; Appendix A: Biographies of Newtown Joiners, 1760-1820 (starting pages 201) ; Appendix B: Biographies of Woodbury Joiners, 1760-1820 (starting pages 217) ; Notes (starting pages 233) ; Glossary of Furniture Terms (starting pages 273) ; Note on Sources and Methods (starting pages 277) ; Index (starting pages 285)
Summary: In Making Furniture in Preindustrial America Edward S. Cooke Jr. offers a fresh and appealing cross-disciplinary study of the furnituremakers, social structure, household possessions, and surviving pieces of furniture of two neighboring New England communities. Drawing on both documentary and artifactual sources, Cooke explores the interplay among producer, process, and style in demonstrating why and how the social economies of these two seemingly similar towns differed significantly during the late colonial and early national periods. Throughout the latter half of the eighteenth century, Cooke explains, the yeoman town of Newtown relied on native joiners whose work satisfied the expectations of their fellow townspeople. These traditionalists combined craftwork with farming and made relatively plain, conservative furniture. By contrast, the typical joiner in the neighboring gentry town of Woodbury was the immigrant innovator. Born and raised elsewhere in Connecticut and serving a diverse clientele, these craftsmen were free of the cultural constraints that affected their Newtown contemporaries. Relying almost entirely on furnituremaking for their livelihood, they were free to pay greater attention to stylistically sensitive features than to mere function.
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Item type Current library Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
TT194.C665 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
TT194.C665 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
TT194.C665 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available

Open access edition supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities/ Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Humanities Open Book Program.

The text of this book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Originally published as Johns Hopkins Press in 1996

List of Tables and Charts Acknowledgments Introduction: The Need for the Artisanal Voice (starting pages 3) ; 1 The Preindustrial Joiner in Western Connecticut, 1760-1820 (starting pages 13) ; 2 The Social Economy of the Preindustrial Joiner (starting pages 33) ; 3 The Joiners of Newtown and Woodbury (starting pages 49) ; 4 Socioeconomic Structure in Newtown and Woodbury (starting pages 69) ; 5 Consumer Behavior in Newtown and Woodbury (starting pages 91) ; 6 Workmanship of Habit: The Furniture of Newtown (starting pages 118) ; 7 Workmanship of Competition: The Furniture of Woodbury (starting pages 151) ; Conclusion: The Response to Market Capitalism (starting pages 190) ; Appendix A: Biographies of Newtown Joiners, 1760-1820 (starting pages 201) ; Appendix B: Biographies of Woodbury Joiners, 1760-1820 (starting pages 217) ; Notes (starting pages 233) ; Glossary of Furniture Terms (starting pages 273) ; Note on Sources and Methods (starting pages 277) ; Index (starting pages 285)

In Making Furniture in Preindustrial America Edward S. Cooke Jr. offers a fresh and appealing cross-disciplinary study of the furnituremakers, social structure, household possessions, and surviving pieces of furniture of two neighboring New England communities. Drawing on both documentary and artifactual sources, Cooke explores the interplay among producer, process, and style in demonstrating why and how the social economies of these two seemingly similar towns differed significantly during the late colonial and early national periods. Throughout the latter half of the eighteenth century, Cooke explains, the yeoman town of Newtown relied on native joiners whose work satisfied the expectations of their fellow townspeople. These traditionalists combined craftwork with farming and made relatively plain, conservative furniture. By contrast, the typical joiner in the neighboring gentry town of Woodbury was the immigrant innovator. Born and raised elsewhere in Connecticut and serving a diverse clientele, these craftsmen were free of the cultural constraints that affected their Newtown contemporaries. Relying almost entirely on furnituremaking for their livelihood, they were free to pay greater attention to stylistically sensitive features than to mere function.

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