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Middlebrow Matters Women's reading and the literary canon in France since the Belle Époque / Diana Holmes. [print]

By: Holmes, Diana, 1949- [author]Contributor(s): Project Muse []Material type: TextTextSeries: Contemporary French and francophone cultures ; 57Description: 1 online resource (1 online resource 244 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781786949523Subject(s): LITERARY CRITICISM/ European/ French | Social classes in literature | Literature | Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers | French fiction | French fiction -- Women authors | Women -- France -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Women and literature -- France -- History -- 20th century | Social classes in literature | French fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism | French fiction -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Feminism in literature | FranceGenre/Form: History. | Criticism, interpretation, etc. | Electronic books. LOC classification: PQ673PQ673.H749.M533 2018Online resources: Click here to access online COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission: https://lib.ciu.edu/copyright-request-formSummary: Middlebrow is a derogatory word that connotes blandness, mediocrity and a failed aspiration to 'high' culture. However, when appropriated as a positive term to denote that wide swathe of literature between the challenging experimentalism of the high and the formulaic drive of the popular, it enables a rethinking of the literary canon from the point of view of what most readers actually read, a criterion curiously absent from dominant definitions of literary value. Since women have long formed a majority of the nation's reading public, this perspective immediately feminises what has always been a very male canon. Opening with a theorisation of the concept of middlebrow that mounts a defence of some literary qualities disdained by modernism, the book then focuses on a series of case studies of periods (the Belle Epoque, inter-war, early twenty-first century), authors (including Colette, Irene Nemirovsky, Francoise Sagan, Anna Gavalda) and the middlebrow nature of literary prizes.
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Item type Current library Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
PQ673.H656 2018 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
PQ673.H656 2018 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
PQ673.H656 2018 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available

Middlebrow is a derogatory word that connotes blandness, mediocrity and a failed aspiration to 'high' culture. However, when appropriated as a positive term to denote that wide swathe of literature between the challenging experimentalism of the high and the formulaic drive of the popular, it enables a rethinking of the literary canon from the point of view of what most readers actually read, a criterion curiously absent from dominant definitions of literary value. Since women have long formed a majority of the nation's reading public, this perspective immediately feminises what has always been a very male canon. Opening with a theorisation of the concept of middlebrow that mounts a defence of some literary qualities disdained by modernism, the book then focuses on a series of case studies of periods (the Belle Epoque, inter-war, early twenty-first century), authors (including Colette, Irene Nemirovsky, Francoise Sagan, Anna Gavalda) and the middlebrow nature of literary prizes.

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