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Rethinking Authority in the Carolingian Empire Rutger Kramer. [print]

By: Kramer, Rutger [author]Contributor(s): Project Muse []Material type: TextTextSeries: The early medieval North AtlanticDescription: 1 online resource (277 pages) : mapContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789048532681; 904853268XSubject(s): Louis I, Emperor, 778-840 | Louis I, Emperor, 778-840 | Italy | France | Italy -- Politics and government -- 476-1268 | France -- Politics and government -- To 987 | Politics and government | Church and state | Carolingians | Carolingians | Authority -- Religious aspects -- Catholic Church -- History | Church and state -- Italy -- History -- To 1500 | Church and state -- France -- History -- To 1500Genre/Form: History. LOC classification: DC74DC74.K89.R484 2019Online resources: Click here to access online COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission: https://lib.ciu.edu/copyright-request-formSummary: "By the early ninth century, the responsibility for a series of social, religious and political transformations had become an integral part of running the Carolingian empire. This became especially clear when, in 813/4, Louis the Pious and his court seized the momentum generated by their predecessors and broadened the scope of these reforms ever further. These reformers knew they represented a movement greater than the sum of its parts; the interdependence between those wielding imperial authority and those bearing responsibility for ecclesiastical reforms was driven by comprehensive, yet still surprisingly diverse expectations. Taking this diversity as a starting point, this book takes a fresh look at the optimistic first decades of the ninth century. Extrapolating from a series of detailed case studies rather than presenting a new grand narrative, it offers new interpretations of contemporary theories of personal improvement and institutional correctio, and shows the self-awareness of its main instigators as they pondered what it meant to be a good Christian in a good Christian empire"--
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Item type Current library Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
DC74.K736 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
DC74.K736 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available

"By the early ninth century, the responsibility for a series of social, religious and political transformations had become an integral part of running the Carolingian empire. This became especially clear when, in 813/4, Louis the Pious and his court seized the momentum generated by their predecessors and broadened the scope of these reforms ever further. These reformers knew they represented a movement greater than the sum of its parts; the interdependence between those wielding imperial authority and those bearing responsibility for ecclesiastical reforms was driven by comprehensive, yet still surprisingly diverse expectations. Taking this diversity as a starting point, this book takes a fresh look at the optimistic first decades of the ninth century. Extrapolating from a series of detailed case studies rather than presenting a new grand narrative, it offers new interpretations of contemporary theories of personal improvement and institutional correctio, and shows the self-awareness of its main instigators as they pondered what it meant to be a good Christian in a good Christian empire"--

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