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Conducting business across borders : effective communication in English with non-native speakers / Adrian Wallwork. [print]

By: Wallwork, Adrian [author]Material type: TextTextSeries: Corporate communication collectionPublication details: New York, New York (222 East 46th Street, New York, New York 10017) : Business Expert Press, [(c)2018. Edition: First editionDescription: 1 online resource (xvi, 154 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781631578083Subject(s): Business communication | English language -- Business English | Multilingual communication | Intercultural communication | English-speaking countries | business | cross cultural communication | culture | EFL | English | ESL | interpreters | languages | meetings | native speakers | negotiations | nonnative speakers | presentations | socializing | stereotyping | translationLOC classification: HF5718HF5718.W215.C663 2018Online resources: Click here to access online COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
1. Getting started 2. Email 3. Speaking and listening 4. Reading and writing 5. Meetings and negotiations 6. Presentations, demos, workshops, seminars 7. Translating and interpreting 8. Socializing Sources Index.
Abstract: Most misunderstandings boil down to language--how we use words and how we say them. If this is true within our own language, when we communicate across cultures the problem becomes far more critical. However, because we know we are of different cultures, we tend to blame misunderstandings on differences in culture, ignoring the fact that we may simply have misinterpreted what the other person has said to us, or we may not have been clear in what we said to that person. This book explains how to communicate in English with non-native speakers in a way that should minimize such misunderstandings. For non-native speakers, communicating with native speakers is a stressful and difficult process. Few native speakers make concessions, in terms of vocabulary used and speed of delivery, so that non-native speakers are left feeling bewildered, frustrated, humiliated, and with a slight (generally unconscious) feeling of inferiority that they have been unable to understand what has been said. Chapter 1 discusses the dangers of stereotyping and the key difficulties non-natives have with the way mother tongue speakers communicate in English. Chapters 2 and 3 focus on written English and readability, particularly in emails and reports. Chapter 4 covers the elements of the way you speak that may impede on successful communication. Chapters 5 and 6 cover meetings and negotiations; and giving presentations and demos, respectively. Chapter 7 focuses on the use of translation, translators and interpreters. The social side of business communication is discussed in the closing chapter.
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Item type Current library Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
HF5718 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available
Online Book Online Book G Allen Fleece Library
Online
HF5718 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Link to resource Available

1. Getting started 2. Email 3. Speaking and listening 4. Reading and writing 5. Meetings and negotiations 6. Presentations, demos, workshops, seminars 7. Translating and interpreting 8. Socializing Sources Index.

Most misunderstandings boil down to language--how we use words and how we say them. If this is true within our own language, when we communicate across cultures the problem becomes far more critical. However, because we know we are of different cultures, we tend to blame misunderstandings on differences in culture, ignoring the fact that we may simply have misinterpreted what the other person has said to us, or we may not have been clear in what we said to that person. This book explains how to communicate in English with non-native speakers in a way that should minimize such misunderstandings. For non-native speakers, communicating with native speakers is a stressful and difficult process. Few native speakers make concessions, in terms of vocabulary used and speed of delivery, so that non-native speakers are left feeling bewildered, frustrated, humiliated, and with a slight (generally unconscious) feeling of inferiority that they have been unable to understand what has been said. Chapter 1 discusses the dangers of stereotyping and the key difficulties non-natives have with the way mother tongue speakers communicate in English. Chapters 2 and 3 focus on written English and readability, particularly in emails and reports. Chapter 4 covers the elements of the way you speak that may impede on successful communication. Chapters 5 and 6 cover meetings and negotiations; and giving presentations and demos, respectively. Chapter 7 focuses on the use of translation, translators and interpreters. The social side of business communication is discussed in the closing chapter.

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