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Reading Hebrews and 1 Peter with the African American Great Migration : diaspora, place, and identity / Jennifer T. Kaalund. [print]

By: Kaalund, Jennifer T [author]Material type: TextTextSeries: Library of New Testament studies ; 598. | T & T Clark library of biblical studiesPublication details: London, England ; New York, New York : T and T Clark, [(c)2019. Description: ix, 166 pages ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780567694898; 0567679985; 9780567679987; 0567694895Subject(s): African Americans -- Migrations -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- History -- 1877-1964 | Identity (Psychology) -- Religious aspects -- Christianity | United StatesLOC classification: BS2775.52.K335.H437 2019BS2775.52.K11.R433 2019COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission:
Contents:
Diaspora space, displaced identities, and diasporic religion ; A place to call home: the Great Migration and the making of the new Negro ; Called out: Alexandrian Jewish identity in the Roman imperial context ; A better country: Hebrews and an identity formerly known as Jewish ; A peculiar people: 1 Peter and an identity that will come to be known as Christian ; Called out: rethinking centers and margins.
Dissertation note: Revision of author's thesis under title: Dis/locating diaspora : reading Hebrews and First Peter with the African American Great Migration. Ph.D. Drew University 2015 Thesis Summary: In this new examination of the formation of African American identity, Jennifer Kaalund examines the constructed and contested Christian-Jewish identities in Hebrews and 1 Peter through the lens of the "New Negro," a diasporic identity similarly constructed and contested during the Great Migration in the early 20th century. As both identites emerged in a context marked by instability, creativity, and the necessity of permanence, Kaalund argues that they both also show complex internal diversity and debate that disrupts any simple articulation as purely resistant (or accommodating) to its hegmonic and oppressive environment. --Book cover.
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Non-fiction BS2775.52.K335.H437 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 31923001808274

Revision of author's thesis under title: Dis/locating diaspora : reading Hebrews and First Peter with the African American Great Migration. Ph.D. Drew University 2015 Thesis

Diaspora space, displaced identities, and diasporic religion ; A place to call home: the Great Migration and the making of the new Negro ; Called out: Alexandrian Jewish identity in the Roman imperial context ; A better country: Hebrews and an identity formerly known as Jewish ; A peculiar people: 1 Peter and an identity that will come to be known as Christian ; Called out: rethinking centers and margins.

In this new examination of the formation of African American identity, Jennifer Kaalund examines the constructed and contested Christian-Jewish identities in Hebrews and 1 Peter through the lens of the "New Negro," a diasporic identity similarly constructed and contested during the Great Migration in the early 20th century. As both identites emerged in a context marked by instability, creativity, and the necessity of permanence, Kaalund argues that they both also show complex internal diversity and debate that disrupts any simple articulation as purely resistant (or accommodating) to its hegmonic and oppressive environment. --Book cover. Link to source of summary

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