The end of youth ministry? : why parents don't really care about youth groups and what youth workers should do about it / Andrew Root.

By: Root, Andrew, 1974- []Material type: TextTextSeries: Theology for the life of the world: Publisher: Grand Rapids, MI : Baker Academic, a division of Baker Publishing Group, ©2020Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 225 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781493420179; 1493420178Subject(s): Church work with youth | Church work with families | ReligionGenre/Form: Electronic books. LOC classification: BV4447Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Toward a journey to joy ; Don't waste your life: youth ministry and the good life ; Are the kids OK? Goods and youth ministry ; Three sets of parents: things and happiness emerge ; Identity, part 1: a dance party, Demi Lovato, and the internal quest ; Transformation in youth ministry ; Identity, part 2: romance, recognition, and resentment ; Happiness, part 1: Powerball, endgames, and Sheryl Crow versus Taylor Swift ; When goods become the good ; Happiness, part 2: holiness, virtue, and Luther's freak-out ; Joy and the custodian: what youth ministry is for ; Borne burdens: youth ministry and stories of joy ; Open takes and closed spins: youth ministry and transcendence ; An identity event: how youth ministry affects identity ; Holding vigil: youth ministry and cruciform practices ; Conclusion: friendship and DQ.
Summary: What is youth ministry actually for? And does it have a future? Andrew Root, a leading scholar in youth ministry and practical theology, went on a one-year journey to answer these questions. In this book, Root weaves together an innovative first-person fictional narrative to diagnose the challenges facing the church today and to offer a new vision for youth ministry in the 21st century. Informed by interviews that Root conducted with parents, this book explores how parents' perspectives of what constitutes a good life are affecting youth ministry. In today's culture, youth ministry can't compete with sports, test prep, and the myriad other activities in which young people participate. Through a unique parable-style story, Root offers a new way to think about the purpose of youth ministry: not happiness, but joy. Joy is a sense of experiencing the good. For youth ministry to be about joy, it must move beyond the youth group model and rework the assumptions of how identity and happiness are imagined by parents in American society.
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Toward a journey to joy ; Don't waste your life: youth ministry and the good life ; Are the kids OK? Goods and youth ministry ; Three sets of parents: things and happiness emerge ; Identity, part 1: a dance party, Demi Lovato, and the internal quest ; Transformation in youth ministry ; Identity, part 2: romance, recognition, and resentment ; Happiness, part 1: Powerball, endgames, and Sheryl Crow versus Taylor Swift ; When goods become the good ; Happiness, part 2: holiness, virtue, and Luther's freak-out ; Joy and the custodian: what youth ministry is for ; Borne burdens: youth ministry and stories of joy ; Open takes and closed spins: youth ministry and transcendence ; An identity event: how youth ministry affects identity ; Holding vigil: youth ministry and cruciform practices ; Conclusion: friendship and DQ.

What is youth ministry actually for? And does it have a future? Andrew Root, a leading scholar in youth ministry and practical theology, went on a one-year journey to answer these questions. In this book, Root weaves together an innovative first-person fictional narrative to diagnose the challenges facing the church today and to offer a new vision for youth ministry in the 21st century. Informed by interviews that Root conducted with parents, this book explores how parents' perspectives of what constitutes a good life are affecting youth ministry. In today's culture, youth ministry can't compete with sports, test prep, and the myriad other activities in which young people participate. Through a unique parable-style story, Root offers a new way to think about the purpose of youth ministry: not happiness, but joy. Joy is a sense of experiencing the good. For youth ministry to be about joy, it must move beyond the youth group model and rework the assumptions of how identity and happiness are imagined by parents in American society.

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