Socialism, the church and the poor / by P.T. Forsyth. [print]

By: Forsyth, Peter Taylor, 1848-1921 [author]Material type: TextTextPublisher: London, England : Hodder and Stoughton, (c)1908Description: 73 pages ; 21 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781979534741Subject(s): Jesus Christ -- Teachings | Church and the world | Socialism and ChristianityLOC classification: BR115COPYRIGHT NOT covered - Click this link to request copyright permission: https://ciu.libwizard.com/f/copyright-requests
Contents:
PART I. THE CHURCH AND SOCIALISM
PART II. CHRIST AND THE POOR
Summary: This is a reprint of P. T. Forsyth's classic book "Socialism, the Church and the Poor". Peter Taylor Forsyth, also known as P. T. Forsyth, (1848–1921) was a Scottish theologian. The son of a postman, Forsyth studied at the University of Aberdeen and then in Göttingen (under Albrecht Ritschl). He was ordained into the Congregational ministry and served churches as pastor at Bradford, Manchester, Leicester and Cambridge, before becoming Principal of Hackney College, London (later subsumed into the University of London) in 1901. An early interest in critical theology made him suspect to some more 'orthodox' Christians. However, he increasingly came to the conclusion that liberal theology failed to account adequately for the moral problem of the guilty conscience. This led him to a moral crisis which he found resolved in the atoning work of Christ. The experience helped to shape and inform a vigorous interest in the issues of holiness and atonement. Although Forsyth rejected many of his earlier liberal leanings he retained many of Adolf von Harnack's criticisms of Chalcedonian Christology. This led him to expound a kenotic doctrine of the incarnation (clearly influenced by Bishop Charles Gore and Thomasius). Where he differed from other kenotic theologies of the atonement was the claim that Christ did not give up his divine attributes but condensed them; i.e., the incarnation was the expression of God's omnipotence rather than its negation. His theology and attack on liberal Christianity can be found in his most famous work, The Person and Place of Christ (1909), which anticipated much of the neo-orthodox theology of the next generation. He has sometimes been coined the 'Barthian before Barth', but this fails to account for many areas of divergence with the Swiss theologian's thought. AMAZON https://www.amazon.com/Socialism-Church-Poor-P-Forsyth/dp/1979534748/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=9781979534741&qid=1632075494&sr=8-1
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Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) Circulating Book (checkout times vary with patron status) G Allen Fleece Library
Pamphlets
BR115.F677.S635 2017 (Browse shelf) Available 31923002050454

"Part I appeared in substance in the British Congregationalist."

PART I. THE CHURCH AND SOCIALISM

PART II. CHRIST AND THE POOR

Link to source of summary This is a reprint of P. T. Forsyth's classic book "Socialism, the Church and the Poor". Peter Taylor Forsyth, also known as P. T. Forsyth, (1848–1921) was a Scottish theologian. The son of a postman, Forsyth studied at the University of Aberdeen and then in Göttingen (under Albrecht Ritschl). He was ordained into the Congregational ministry and served churches as pastor at Bradford, Manchester, Leicester and Cambridge, before becoming Principal of Hackney College, London (later subsumed into the University of London) in 1901. An early interest in critical theology made him suspect to some more 'orthodox' Christians. However, he increasingly came to the conclusion that liberal theology failed to account adequately for the moral problem of the guilty conscience. This led him to a moral crisis which he found resolved in the atoning work of Christ. The experience helped to shape and inform a vigorous interest in the issues of holiness and atonement. Although Forsyth rejected many of his earlier liberal leanings he retained many of Adolf von Harnack's criticisms of Chalcedonian Christology. This led him to expound a kenotic doctrine of the incarnation (clearly influenced by Bishop Charles Gore and Thomasius). Where he differed from other kenotic theologies of the atonement was the claim that Christ did not give up his divine attributes but condensed them; i.e., the incarnation was the expression of God's omnipotence rather than its negation. His theology and attack on liberal Christianity can be found in his most famous work, The Person and Place of Christ (1909), which anticipated much of the neo-orthodox theology of the next generation. He has sometimes been coined the 'Barthian before Barth', but this fails to account for many areas of divergence with the Swiss theologian's thought. AMAZON

https://www.amazon.com/Socialism-Church-Poor-P-Forsyth/dp/1979534748/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=9781979534741&qid=1632075494&sr=8-1

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