Indigenous religion(s) : local grounds, global networks / Siv Ellen Kraft, Bjørn Ola Tafjord, Arkotong Longkumer, Gregory D. Alles, Greg Johnson.

By: Kraft, Siv-Ellen []Material type: TextTextPublisher: Abingdon, Oxon ; New York , NY : Routledge, 2020Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781003021513; 1003021514; 9781000095876; 1000095878; 9781000095906; 1000095908; 9781000095937; 1000095932Subject(s): Indigenous peoples -- Religion | Indigenous peoples -- Religion -- Case studies | RELIGION / GeneralLOC classification: BL380Online resources: Taylor & Francis Click here to access this RESOURCE ONLINE Summary: "What counts as "indigenous religion" in today's world? Who claims this category? What are the processes through which local entities become recognizable as "religious" and "indigenous"? How is all of this connected to struggles for power, rights and sovereignty? This book sheds light on the contemporary lives of indigenous religion(s), through case studies from Sápmi, Nagaland, Talamanca, Hawai'i, and Gujarat, and through a shared focus on translations, performances, mediation and sovereignty. It builds on long term case-studies, and on the collaborative comparison of a long term project, including shared fieldwork. At the center of its concerns is translations between a globalizing discourse (indigenous religion in the singular) and distinct local traditions (indigenous religions in the plural). With contributions from leading scholars in the field, this book is a must read for students and researchers in indigenous religions, including those in related fields such as religious studies and social anthropology"--
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"What counts as "indigenous religion" in today's world? Who claims this category? What are the processes through which local entities become recognizable as "religious" and "indigenous"? How is all of this connected to struggles for power, rights and sovereignty? This book sheds light on the contemporary lives of indigenous religion(s), through case studies from Sápmi, Nagaland, Talamanca, Hawai'i, and Gujarat, and through a shared focus on translations, performances, mediation and sovereignty. It builds on long term case-studies, and on the collaborative comparison of a long term project, including shared fieldwork. At the center of its concerns is translations between a globalizing discourse (indigenous religion in the singular) and distinct local traditions (indigenous religions in the plural). With contributions from leading scholars in the field, this book is a must read for students and researchers in indigenous religions, including those in related fields such as religious studies and social anthropology"--

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